BrooklynVegan CMJ Day Party

~+ free Bells until it's gone +~

BrooklynVegan CMJ Day Party

Lilys, Jessica Lea Mayfield, Martin Courtney, Frankie Cosmos, The So So Glos, Dilly Dally, The Gotobeds, Wildhoney, Stealing Sheep, Mothers, Shopping, Meat Wave, Methyl Ethel, Lemon Twigs, Murals, Petal

Sat, October 17, 2015

12:00 pm

Baby's All Right

Brooklyn, NY

$0.00

This event is 21 and over

BrooklynVegan CMJ Day Party
BrooklynVegan CMJ Day Party
Lilys
Lilys
"Corruption Wrecked My Life"

A very special one time only engagement featuring never before or rarely performed early material 1990-1995 (Eccsame The Photon Band, In The Presence of Nothing, & more)

Featuring Kurt Heasley
with / musical director Don De Vore and:

James Richardson (MGMT)
Will Berman (MGMT)
Travis Rosenberg
Matt Werth (RVNG Intl. founder)
Ryan Rapsys (Euphone, The Sea & Cake)
Alex Craig (Limited, Ducktails, Big Troubles)
Jessica Lea Mayfield
Jessica Lea Mayfield
Sorry Is Gone

“The whole record is about me taking my life back, without really realizing it,” she says. “I realized I’m the only person that is going to look out for me. I have to be my main person. No one else.”

Jessica Lea Mayfield might make some people uncomfortable with the level of honesty she projects on her forthcoming LP, Sorry Is Gone, but she’s not going to apologize – for that, or for anything else on her complex, confessional fourth album. Recorded with producer John Agnello (Sonic Youth, Kurt Vile, Phosphorescent and Dinosaur Jr.), Sorry Is Gone is a raw document of a woman in progress; one weathering cruel storms but finally able to blame the rain itself for the flood. Written as the truth of her own poisonous marriage unfolded before her eyes, Sorry Is Gone is a record of permission. Permission to create freely, to escape what is no longer safe and to stop bearing responsibility for things done to her, not by her. As Mayfield sings on the title track, “the sorry is gone.” Indeed, it is; kicked to the curb with every strum of her guitar.

Written in the years since her last solo LP, Make My Head Sing, in 2014, and her 2015 collaboration with Seth Avett, Seth Avett and Jessica Lea Mayfield Sing Elliott Smith, Sorry Is Gone became the soundtrack to a highly personal and traumatic story. The Ohio-born Mayfield was quietly enduring years of domestic abuse, smiling and touring while she hid a brewing tempest – and the bruises, too. But lyrics don’t lie even as bruises fade, and they started to tell the tale of her marriage before she was even able to; songs often dark and dangerous and ready to confront and claim her life. Written primarily on an acoustic baritone guitar – out of necessity at first, in her thin-walled apartment – Mayfield started to process the years of hurt and uncertainty through words and melodies that helped her see the light in the darkness.

Though much of Make My Head Sing was written music-first, Sorry Is Gone began with those lyrics, and, so often, a path forward unfolded itself as the songs formed. “The cold hard truth is you love me too much,” she sings on “Meadow,” a moody, echoey moment about finally realizing someone’s true colors. “The cold hard truth is you couldn’t love me enough.” It’s a brutal line from someone who refuses to be victimized. Evoking the pathos of nineties grunge, the folk confessions of her idol, Smith, and the cool blasé of bands like Luscious Jackson, the tracks that comprise Sorry Is Gone aren’t devised to make anyone comfortable but herself – but they are there to help share an emotional journal and a certain kind of healing that can only come through music.

“I have to sing about things and write about things that have happened to me as therapy,” says Mayfield, who shaped so many of these songs in the isolation of the small apartment she shared with her husband while their marriage fell apart in her hands – in many ways, those songs pointed to the way out before she could get there herself. “That’s what connects me to other music I listen to. I want music to make me feel things. This is my inner dialogue, and my chance to get the last word.”

Recorded with Agnello at Water Music and Electric Lady Studios, Mayfield recruited a stellar group of musicians for Sorry Is Gone, including Avett on backing vocals and keys, drummer Steve Shelley (Sonic Youth, Sun Kil Moon), bassist Emil Amos (Grails, Holy Sons), guitarist Cameron Deyell (Sia, Streets of Laredo) and Patrick Damphier (The Mynabirds, Field Days, who produced and played on “Offa My Hands”). Together, they worked to create an ominous take on love, where hope can exist among heartbreak and the end is only as finite as we make it to be. On songs like the title track and “Bum Me Out,” Mayfield bends the angelic notes of her voice over off-kilter orchestration, building an environment of warrior-style triumph; on “Safe 2 Connect 2,” she takes stock of the digital world to a haunting, acoustic backdrop that gives a subtle ode to her bluegrass roots.

“Been though hell, there’s no telling what might happen in my future,” she sings. “All I can do is be thankful for each moment that’s my own.”

Mayfield has paved an unconventional lifestyle – playing in her family’s bluegrass band since the age of eight, she didn’t have any traditional schooling and released her first album at the age of fifteen, when she was discovered by Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys. Influenced by everything from that mountain sound to the modern garage, Mayfield has been able to come at songwriting from a pure perspective, lead more by her heart than any textbook. It’s what makes the tracks of Sorry Is Gone so striking and visceral – there is no filter on the emotions, no rulebook and certainly no excuses for anything she’s been through or the candor she fires.

“I’m not going to bite my lip on anything,” she says. “If there is one thing I am going to do, it’s talk and sing about what I want to. No one is going to manipulate me.”

The sorry is gone, once and for all – and Sorry Is Gone is a permission slip for anyone who wants to stop apologizing for others, and start living for themselves. ●
Martin Courtney
Martin Courtney
Now that every record is a “big event”, it’s hard to figure out what really matters. Sometimes the quieter moments are things you connect with, and Martin Courtney, the frontman of Real Estate, just made an album of intimate moments worth treasuring.

After the 2014 release of Atlas, the third LP from Ridgewood, New Jersey’s Real Estate, Courtney started quietly chipping away at some new songs while he was waiting to head back on the road with his band. The idea was that they would be his songs. They’d be a little more compact and concise, a little less abstract. “I was trying to do a straightforward pop thing,” he says.

It turns out that what Courtney actually means when he talks about straightforward pop is a collection of soft psychedelia that recalls the Kinks and Big Star even as it probes the depths of his own life as a family man, father, and touring musician. Many Moons is breezy, full of subtle introspection, an elliptical document of Courtney’s transition into family life and fatherhood, largely written while he was on the road. “My original goal for this record was to write songs about one specific idea and have that be that,” he says. “A lot of times with my songs in the past it was very abstract. A phrase would come into my head and I would have no idea what the song was about until months later.” You can hear the newfound clarity of his songwriting on “Airport Bar,” which finds Courtney wasting time waiting for his next flight, grappling with boredom and longing: “It’s half past two in the afternoon/ and I wish I could see your faces/ wondering where you are from an airport bar/ it’s a useless exercise but what’s time wasted.” It is a plain emotional sentiment, but it feels important and real.

After writing a couple tracks, Courtney realized what he was working on was slowly turning into a full LP, so he enlisted the help of Jarvis Taveniere of Woods to produce and play on the bulk of the record. He also brought in Real Estate’s keyboard player Matt Kallman, longtime friend Julian Lynch, and a whole host of others. Over the next year-and-a-half, the pair recorded sporadically. The result is an album that feels lush and calm, but with a newfound sonic clarity, a brightness often rounded out with orchestral arrangements. The instrumental title track is a bucolic, string and flute number that wouldn’t be out of place on a prime-era Pentangle record.

Courtney has long made a career of writing songs about what happens when your image of home is something you’re trying to hold on to, when the nostalgia that used to comfort you starts to feel unfamiliar, but on Many Moons, he’s moved through that. It doesn’t feel like a rejection of nostalgia, but an embrace of what’s ahead. It is an album-length meditation on his life right now, which is the type of exploration Courtney has become exceptional at.

You can hear the change in his arrangements, which still retain the laconic, squinting-at-the-sun vibe of the best Real Estate songs. On the musically upbeat but lyrically conflicted “Northern Highway,” he sings, “life out here can make you weary/folks at home all wishing well/I just wish I had you near me/I don’t stand a chance in hell,” cloaking his jetlagged exhaustion in a track that expertly straddles the line of longing and contentment.

Courtney’s always been an expert writer of restlessness and duality, with what it means to grow older with full awareness that he’s growing older. On “Vestiges,” his most lyrically dense piece of writing yet, he sings, “Black mold basements and fenced in yard/rhapsodizing in packed out cars/one can hope that it’s in the cards for you/ But this place is like a column of stone/many moons for it to grow/phases they will come and they will go.”

Like the rest of the album, the sadness inherent in this kind of remembrance creeps up on you, and then it starts to feel a lot less like sadness, and a lot more like loving embrace of a specific time. “I like the idea of being a musician, but I’ve always really not liked the idea of putting too much of myself out there,” he says. “I like the idea of disappearing into a band.”

Without a band to disappear into, Courtney made the kind of record that worms its way into your brain and becomes part of your life without you knowing it. “It’s always good to have some air in the room,” he says. Many Moons is the sound of Courtney looking at the life he’s built for himself, the success of his band, and taking a deep breath, letting all the pressure go and just working through the life that’s right in front of him.
Frankie Cosmos
Frankie Cosmos
Frankie Cosmos is a 4-piece band consisting of Greta Kline (vocals, guitar), Aaron Maine (drums), David Maine (bass), and Gabrielle Smith (keyboard, vocals). Their performances vary from slow sad ballads to goofy rock’n'roll love songs. They are based out of New York City (where Greta and Gabby grew up) and Pleasantville (where the Maine brothers grew up). The four members are each influenced by a wide variety of music, and all come from distinct music backgrounds.
The So So Glos
The So So Glos
The So So Glos began in 1991 when brothers Alex Levine & Ryan Levine met Zach Staggers in kindergarten in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. Through a series of divorces and remarriages the three became brothers. They played music before they knew how to under monikers such as SPITT, Urban Eyze & Every Other Weekend.

In 2007 Matt Elkin joined the band to complete the family and The So So Glos were born. The four went on to co-found The Market Hotel in 2008 & Shea Stadium in 2010. The two D.I.Y. all ages music venues have become staples of Brooklyn's underground music community.

In 2013 The band released Blowout on their own imprint of Shea Stadium Records. Blowout saw praise from the grassroots fanbase they had built as well as mainstream media outlets propelling them from garage band to local heroes in the national spotlight. The release of Blowout also secured 'em thier national television debut performing "Son of an American" on the Late Show with David Letterman.

The So So Glos live show is known for its high energy and crowd engagement. Whether they play a punk house in Brooklyn, a beach party in Miami or a Basketball Arena in San Antonio, they always play with the same excitement & zeal the songs deserve.

They have recently shared the stage with bands such as Conor Oberst's reunited Desaparecidos, The Pogues, Trail of Dead, Ted Leo, Brand New, Rocket from the Crypt, Matt & Kim, The Hold Steady & Raekwon of Wu Tang Clan.

To date they have released 2 LP's, 2 EP's & several singles - all with production by thier childhood friend and lifelong producer Adam Reich (aka The 5th Glo).

They are always on tour.
Dilly Dally
Dilly Dally
For twelve years Katie Monks and Liz Ball have been connected through music. A sister-like bond that requires no words. The two Toronto-based musicians met in high school over a common love of legendary bands like The Pixies, scrawling lyrics and poetry to mimic their heroes. Both self-taught guitarists, Ball and Monks also idolized the lackadaisical sorrow of Kurt Cobain, Christopher Owens and Pete Doherty, slowly manifesting that admiration into their own band they called Dilly Dally.

“We started a band because we believed in ourselves,” says Monks, “and we believed in Music—almost like it was a religion.” .

That whole-hearted, delusional blind faith is what brings any musician to a point of both contention and success: you do not care, but you care so much it hurts. The reality of today’s industry is long-cycle touring, frivolous press duties, tweets by the handful that paint life wealthier than it is and a mouth of Ramen, but what differs today is that those who pursue a band do it because they really, really need to. There’s no promise of an easy, stress-free future. The feeling is intrinsic, an obsession that cannot be traded in for a bigger bankroll. In the last six years of “being drenched in the Toronto music scene,” Dilly Dally found inspiration while doing the early 20’s struggle of “working shit jobs, being in debt, partying too much and hustling in a band.” When you rely on music for anything but love, it spits you out like poison and Dilly Dally are aware of this. .
The Gotobeds
The Gotobeds
Pittsburgh, PA band The Gotobeds have signed a worldwide recording deal with Sub Pop Records. As fans of The Gotobeds from their very first cassette release up through their excellent debut LP, Poor People Are Revolting, released in 2014 on Gerard Cosloy's 12XU label, we here at Sub Pop couldn't be happier to work with these fine young men.

Who the heck are The Gotobeds, you ask? Well, here's the deal, according to the band's singer/guitarist Hazy Lazer (real name TBD):

Around March 2009, shortly after I lost my job, I bumped into my longtime friend Parryman at an all-night art gallery and we talked about finally making a band stick beyond a couple of drunken, hazy practices. Pittsburgh at the time had a nice, Thatcher-esque feel thanks to the housing bubble bursting, so I was keen to do something beyond getting up at noon and trying to hit my favorite brunch spot. But not too much more.

I had all of these songs sitting around that didn't make sense for my other band, Kim Phuc. Parryman wasn't really a drummer and I wasn't really a singer so it seemed natural that we'd try our hand at those things. We made long lists of bands and strange sounds we wanted to try out. Being from a city that has great bands but is removed from most things gave us time to gestate, and if you're intelligent enough to read between the lines you know I'm covering for the fact that we were initially pretty terrible.

Arid Plateau took on bass duties once he made the correct decision to move from Chicago to Pittsburgh despite only knowing a couple of people here. As far as guitar players go, we had several in our infancy, but each of them turned out to be simply experiencing a moment of transitional chaos before they resigned themselves to the rat race. COOL U, who drummed in Kim Phuc, eventually asked to play guitar with us, which completed our final lineup.

We kicked around for a few years to find our footing. It's easy to form a band with an initial sound or look that is someone else's, but that's always the least interesting way to go about things. So we tried on a few hats to figure out that they didn't fit or they wouldn't get us laid. Most of what we agree on his stuff with guitars in it. I wanted to be the Swell Maps and just make a big bunch of classic songs with junk on top, but we ended up with a mish-mash of DIY/Punk/Post-Punk/Indie sounds ala The Fall, early Pavement, Wire, Wipers, Mission of Burma, Sonic Youth, Total Control, Tyvek, Protomartyr, etc.

We approached our first LP in the fashion of The Replacements' Let It Be, what with the cheeky title and grab-bag of disparate strands of rock. Every band is trying to incorporate too much shit, so we just made sounds that we all loved, and lucked into recording all the songs in one day. "Secs Tape," "Jenna Rations," and "Fucking Machine" are all first takes. The 90's are back! We're waiting to cash our checks.

Important note: The Gotobeds is one word. It's someone's name. We're a punk family like The Ramones or the Osmonds. We're not going to bed anytime soon.

Jah Bless - Hazy Lazer 2014.
Wildhoney
Wildhoney
"Wildhoney are a pop band through and through. While some have thrown around words like "dreamy" and "hazy" to describe their brand of guitar pop, there's something deeper going on that can't be summed up in an easy blog tag. Songs such as "Soft Bats" and "Like Me" aren't just catchy songs, they're songs that stick with you long after they end. This is due to the simple, yet great interplay between vocals and guitars that weave throughout almost effortlessly. "Get Out Of My Dreams" from their upcoming single finds Wildhoney digging a bit deeper and crafting an almost droney pop song that not only is catchy but pulses with life."
Stealing Sheep
Stealing Sheep's acclaimed 2012 debut, 'Into the Diamond Sun', morphed their individual styles to create a 'medieval-kraut-folk' inspired sound. They were described as an unanticipated 'pagan pop revival' and since its release have toured as guests of Postal Service and Alt-J, opened for St.Vincent in Paris, performed the songs of David Lynch at the Barbican and collaborated with the Radiophonic Workshop on an original soundtrack to the cult 70's science fiction film 'La Planete Sauvage'.

For their second album they have concentrated on developing the sonic aesthetic of their music. "We were more focused about what we are trying to do. Everything has a reason for being there." They've experimented with tuned percussion, programmed beats, trigger samples and worked with effected synths, utilising the guitar and lap steel more sparingly and introducing more processed sounds. They've drawn inspiration from 50's exotica, electronic music and 80's pop and been influenced by the likes of Grace Jones, Maya Deren, Eden Ahbez, Delia Derbyshire, Moondog and John Carpenter.

Having learned new skills in the studio over the last few years, the band self-produced the album. They used the studio not only as a writing tool but also as an instrument; experimenting with post-production and varying instrumentation and layered textures. "We started off in pre-production doing all the demos ourselves" say's Becky "the demos captured an atmosphere that we wanted to carry forward to the album. The result was a hypbrid of casual takes and more considered recordings."

The visual representation is highly important to the band, all of whom have art backgrounds. "We like to be involved in all the aspects of the presentation because it's symbiotic to the music." The colourful and organic album cover, a collaboration between photographer Charlotte Rutherford and collage artist Louise Mason, shows their confident image for this record: as they tread the lines of surreal pop. Follow them on a hypnagogic journey as they sing: "listen to yourself and look within".
Mothers
Mothers
Mothers began in 2013 as the solo project of Athens, Georgia-based visual artist Kristine Leschper while she studied printmaking at the Lamar Dodd School of Art. The discipline instilled in her a strong work ethic and an intense focus to detail, while simultaneously inspiring her to pursue other creative aspects of her personality. A self-taught songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, Leschper’s earliest musical influences span a great swath of early aughts rock and folk, such as Sufjan Stevens, Joanna Newsom, The Microphones, and Athens legends Neutral Milk Hotel; she later developed a love for experimental music, math rock, and noise artists, including Lighting Bolt, Hella, Don Caballero, and Tera Melos. As a result, her earliest demos exhibit a sense of striking catharsis under non-traditional song structures, which flirt between strength and vulnerability, and are often quite linear in form.

Leschper wrote the majority of the songs that would evolve into When You Walk A Long Distance You Are Tired while finishing art school in early 2014. Fittingly, as while her attention to visual art and music come from very different creative spaces for her, each cannot help but bleed into one another. The delicately resolute opener “Too Small For Eyes,” which she says is about “being incredibly uncomfortable in your own body and learning how to relate to yourself,” even shares its title with that of her senior thesis project.

Over the course of the year, she played solo shows that earned her local acclaim, including from Flagpole, which praised her “visceral, deeply personal” songs. But she knew that in order to reach her true musical vision, she would need to expand the line-up, so she recruited multi-instrumentalist Matthew Anderegg to help flesh out the arrangements and guide the songs to their final state. They expanded the line-up with guitarist Drew Kirby and, after playing together for only one month’s time, quickly recorded their debut full-length album with producer Drew Vandenberg – who has worked on albums by Of Montreal, Deerhunter and Porcelain Raft – at Chase Park Transduction in Athens in December 2014 (the album also features collaborations with Josh McKay of Deerhunter on vibraphone as well as McKendrick Bearden of Grand Vapids, who played bass and provided string arrangements throughout). Bassist Patrick Morales would later join the band as a permanent fixture.

When You Walk A Long Distance You Are Tired is an introduction to the foundations of the young band, a snapshot of a particular period of their genesis that maps both where they began and where they are heading. It’s the sound of a band being born, in the truest sense: songs that were conceived in Leschper’s solitude and nurtured with added direction from Anderegg. “The name Mothers relates to the idea of creation and being the mother of something. The act of being a Mother is tragic, you have to eventually let go of the things you created,” says Leschper of their name’s origin.

The album’s bookends perhaps most explicitly display this musical chronology. The gorgeous “Too Small For Eyes” was the only one of a few solo songs Leschper had written on the mandolin that made it onto the album, its use of space, piano, strings, and her voice entwining and undulating to elegantly set the stage for what unfolds afterward; closer “Hold Your Own Hand” blooms from its plaintive opening bars to an ascendant, spirally waltz to an uproarious math-y breakdown, hinting at the louder, more post-rock and math rock-influenced sound for which their live show is fast becoming known (the blog Heartbreaking Bravery described one of the band’s CMJ sets as “…intricate, knotty indie pop songs that are equally unpredictable and enticing”). “Copper Mines,” the first song they wrote together as a band, captures the new mix of everyone’s voices and energy on tape, and also informs their other new material, such as “No Crying in Baseball,” a home recorded B-side they wrote together in the months following the completion of When You Walk a Long Distance You Are Tired. “It Hurts Until It Doesn’t,” which looks at the dichotomy of an artist’s ego and sense of self-doubt, falls somewhere in between – the first song she wrote that she saw in the context of something bigger than her performing solo, it takes many twists and turns before arriving, like so many of their songs, at a different sonic place than where it began.

Across the album, Leschper meditates on the human condition: what anyone’s place is in the universe; what is our value; mortality; and what it means to have relationships in consideration of all these things. And while the songs are filtered through her frequently difficult, personal microcosmic experiences, she relates them in a manner that is at once highly intimate and readily universal. At heart, When You Walk A Long Distance You Are Tired is about being alive, and just how surprisingly unmooring – and exhausting – this fundamental thing can be. The album is a window into the long path Leschper traveled while creating it: breathtakingly honest and rooted in the subconscious of one’s journey.

Upon the album’s completion in January 2015, the new quartet line-up steadily played local shows throughout the spring and summer, including at festivals like ATHfest and Slingshot. Before heading out on their first tour supporting Of Montreal, they debuted “No Crying in Baseball,” earning national press attention from Stereogum, NME, Brooklyn Vegan, Ghettoblaster, and others. A headlining east coast tour followed in September, and things began to fall into place. Stereogum named them a ‘Band To Watch’ alongside a premiere of “It Hurts Until It Doesn’t” ahead of their 10-shows-over-five-days jaunt at the 2015 CMJ Music Marathon, which included sets at the Aquarium Drunkard, Brooklyn Vegan and Culture Collide showcases. Both the song and the band earned even more praise throughout the week, including from Vulture, NME, BBC Radio 1, and The Wild Honey Pie, among many others. The following week they were named one of Stereogum’s ’50 Best New Bands of 2015,’ and signed to Grand Jury in the US and Wichita Recordings in the UK.
Shopping
Shopping
Shopping are propulsive bass lines, primitive disco-not-disco drums and guitar lines sharp as broken glass. The band was formed in 2012 by members Rachel Aggs (guitar), Billy Easter (bass) and Andrew Milk (drums), who've all done time in a plethora of notable UK DIY bands including Trash Kit and Wet Dog. They pull from a well of 70's post-punk with a voraciousness seldom seen these days, bringing to mind the jagged aggression of Gang of Four, the voracious yelp of The Slits and the dance inducing thrust of Delta 5 and ESG.
The band released a 7 inch single shortly after forming, which sold out within a week. The band's self-released debut LP, put out via their own MILK records in the UK has received whole-hearted acclaim, selling out their 1000 piece run in just a few months by hand delivering them to top-tier UK shops, who couldn't seem to get enough of their groove riding, tough talking, life-loving post-punk funk. Now the band have signed on to FatCat, with a new LP on the way later in 2015 and to introduce the band stateside we're making their self-released album available here for the first time.
The band are tirelessly committed to taking their sound to new audiences and spreading the Shopping gospel, securing impressive gigs along the way including main support for ESG and Gang Of Four as well as main support on Merchandise's 2014 UK tour. Fully entrenched in the vibrant UK DIY community Shopping are all about being as productive and creative as possible and as such theyve been described by the NME as a "band you need to hear." Their shows are incredibly fun and undeniably thrilling to watch.
Meat Wave
Meat Wave
Loud, melodic punk. Always urgent, sometimes-psychedelic and never happy. Shit's tasteful.
Methyl Ethel
Methyl Ethel
Methyl Ethel is the uninhibited alt-pop project from Perth musician Jake Webb. The band started in 2013, as an outlet for the reverb soaked home recordings Webb was working on whilst developing his ambient and textural guitar playing in a variety of local outfits. Methyl Ethel has since blossomed into one of the most critically revered and publicly embraced acts coming out of Western Australia in some time.

Built from the ground up in various bedrooms, friends’ studios and quiet caverns over 2013, the exceptional EP diptych Guts and Teeth, which explore themes of anxiety, disillusionment and stasis, were released in quick succession. These intricate tapestries of melody, dripping with lush eccentricity, ascended through the ether and onto the airwaves, with Indie Shuffle, Happy, triple j, FBi Radio, 3RRR and RTRFM amongst others all taking note.

So far, 2015 has seen the band hone their sound, on debut LP Oh Inhuman Spectacle and its accompanying singles Twilight Driving and Rogues (awarded 2015 WAM Pop Song of the Year). Recorded in the same manner as its predecessors, Oh Inhuman Spectacle masterfully blends pop and esotericism to create an undeniable piece of work, which has landed at the top of many mid-year album lists and been championed by supporters new and old.

After a year of relentless touring, sharing stages with the likes of San Cisco, Holy Holy, Sunbeam Sound Machine and Courtney Barnett, Methyl Ethel are now a headliner in their own right. With their hometown album launch hitting capacity in a matter of minutes, and their Melbourne date selling out weeks in advance, the excitement surrounding the act and their breathtaking live show is palpable. October will see the band take a break from working on the follow up to Oh Human Spectacle to head stateside for CMJ, with a busy Australian summer to follow.
Lemon Twigs
Lemon Twigs
Multi Instrumentalists Brian and Michael D'Addario who write and record music.
Murals
Murals
With sizzling bass that digs like a rusty spoon against a prison cell wall, dueling guitars, which shimmer like dragonflies skating over the community pool, honey-salted voicings, plucked from the highest branch of a tree in the last moment before a fall to the ground and a broken arm, and drums that pound faster and harder than a flock of kids chasing an ice cream truck, Murals' sound is distinct, tantalizing, and tasteful.
Petal
Run For Cover Records
Venue Information:
Baby's All Right
146 Broadway
Brooklyn, NY, 11211
http://babysallright.com/