Briana Marela

~+ Audiofemme Presents +~

Briana Marela

Wilsen, Gold Child

Wed, November 1, 2017

8:00 pm

Baby's All Right

Brooklyn, NY

$10.00

This event is 21 and over

Briana Marela
Briana Marela
There is something enduring about great love songs, and Briana Marela's Call It Love wraps its wide arms around the subject, invoking all its complexity. From the getgo, Call it Love opens with a reflection on a new love. An unfurling, ambient hum builds slowly, articulating that unmistakable head-in- the-clouds feeling that accompanies early love, before giving way to an uptempo melody and a clattering, joyful chorus. Layers and textures evoke its subtler feelings, while the lyrics speak frankly, holding nothing back. Deepening her songwriting and expanding her palette, Briana Marela has made her proverbial giant leap, to explore the sounds of love in beautiful, striking new ways.

Before writing the songs that would become Call It Love, Briana Marela was typically guided first and foremost by her instincts as a producer and engineer. Marela studied audio production in Olympia at The Evergreen State College, and her previous albums, Speak From Your Heart and All Around Us, capture that early spirit of exploration. Marela's original vision for this album was to dig into the two poles of her songwriting styles: her ambient, ethereal side and her brighter, beat-driven pop leanings. She enlisted the production help of Juan Pieczanski and Ryan Heyner of the band Small Black. Instead of recording everything from scratch in the studio, Marela brought recorded stems for every song that then evolved and developed further in the studio. Pieczanski and Heyner brought a strong percussive instinct, weaving pop and polish into even the most spaced-out cinematic arrangements, and upon hearing their most recent self-produced album, Marela's decision to work with them was almost instantaneous.

"Originally, I was trying to make this album have cohesive pairs of songs," Marela says, "sister songs, where all the ambient songs would have a poppier match, and vice versa." What followed instead was a fusion of the two styles, with Marela's subtler, sweeter side crashing into her bolder, brighter one. "Give Me Your Love" explores what Marela calls "love's immature, silly and selfish side. That eagerness, the feeling of lust and wanting more." It begins almost as an electronic ballad, sweet and inviting, before crashing into a dance-floor rhythm and a winking, flirtatious breakdown. "Feel What I Feel" was first written about Marela's first big breakup when she was barely twenty, but it bears a new sophistication in this recorded version; the lyrics dare the subject to jump back in, even as the music reminds them Marela doesn't need their love to be happy. And then there's the deep, dramatic centerpiece of Call It Love, "Quit." Originally penned about a breakup with a longtime partner, and written with the idea that she could give the song away to another artist, "Quit" is powerful and revealing in Marela's hands; the percussion crashes into her vocals, and the low-end acts like an undertow, wrestling and pulling at its beat.

If "Be In Love" is the sound of falling in love, "Farthest Shore" is the sound of looking inward, of reckoning with oneself. Inspired by the book 'The Farthest Shore' by Ursula K LeGuin, it is one of only two songs not strictly about love, instead exploring what makes our own lives worth living. "I have always had an intense fear of death," Briana explains, "and this book inspired me to remember the magic in pursuing creativity, and that eternal life would actually be very dull." It is an intricate, cavernous song, setting a deceptively pretty melody over ominous, hazy drones and skittering percussion. And here, again, the contradictory becomes complementary.
Wilsen
Wilsen
Even in the frenetic metropolis of New York there are moments of still. You have to wait, bide your time until the early hours, but in the short window between closing time and the early-morning commuters you can find a twilight period of pure, nocturnal, solitude.

‘I Go Missing In My Sleep’ - Wilsen’s debut full-length album - was born during these snatched moments. Ensconced in a tiny rented apartment in Brooklyn, Tamsin Wilson would sit, wait for the twilight and then begin moulding her day’s thoughts into fragments of song.

Using a nylon-stringed acoustic to pick out gentle melodies she drew inspiration from this pre-dawn. The calmness and soundlessness. Everyone asleep and inactive. During these moments time slowed and creative threads could be following without interruption; without the fear of someone hearing her mid-process.

What slowly, methodically, took shape was a collection of delicate songs that valued, even cherished, the creative power of stillness.
The finger-picked melodies, dreamy whistles and Tamsin’s whisper of a voice, all of which underpin ‘I Go Missing In My Sleep’, were born during these moments of still, but it wasn’t until bandmates Drew Arndt & Johnny Simon’s involvement that the use of lightness and space was drawn into beautiful contrast with moments of post-rock ambition.

Coming together - alongside producer & friend Ben Baptie - initially in the UK, then upstate New York, before concluding at The Farm Studio in rural Philadelphia, the trio nudged and corralled each delicate wisp of a song, gradually layering it with washes of icy guitar, short staccato drums & Arndt’s restrained basslines.
The band’s previous offerings, 2013’s double-EP ‘Sirens’ & 2014’s EP ‘Magnolia’, had hinted at a creative trio wrestling to balance the folk intimacy of Tamsin’s hushed tones with a more muscular, experimental side. With ‘I Go Missing In My Sleep’ there’s a sense of much more at play than a mere delicate balancing act; this is a rich, dynamic mix that’s coalesced into a singularly musical form that’s pure, confident and unique.

From the opening creep of ‘Centipede’, a shuffling, eerie masterpiece that questions self-honesty, through the multi-layered fan-favourite ‘Garden’, buoyant on a bed of intricate finger-picking & recently surpassing 2.5 million Spotify streams, and onto the climactic ‘Told You’, this is a record of detailed perfection.
Announcing the record in early February with new track ‘Heavy Steps’, Wilsen will slowly begin the process of introducing the outside world to their moments of crystallised calm, before unveiling ‘I Go Missing In My Sleep’ in full in late spring 2017.
Forget the Quiet, things are about to get a little Noisy.
Gold Child
Gold Child
Gold Child is a Brooklyn-based psych-folk group fronted by singer/songwriter, Emily Fehler and joined by Jake Beal on drums. Fehler moved to New York after finishing her studies at Berklee College of Music. As she began the process of coming up for air in Brooklyn, she developed an obsession with the music made by the great female troubadours of country music’s golden era — namely the work of luminary songstresses Patsy Cline and Emmylou Harris. Seduced by the raw emotion and timeless melodies of the classics, Fehler — a gifted vocalist herself — had found a new direction and sought to apply her own stamp to the form. With the addition of ethereal, shimmering atmospherics to her own folk songs, Fehler laid the groundwork for what would become Gold Child’s sound.

Gold Child recently released their Sophomore single, “Me And You”, drawing comparisons to Mazzy Star, Angel Olsen, and Neko Case, and is currently working on the band’s debut full length due out this Spring.
Venue Information:
Baby's All Right
146 Broadway
Brooklyn, NY, 11211
http://babysallright.com/