FlatBox + Dr. Martens present Tess Parks, Heaters

FlatBox + Dr. Martens present Tess Parks, Heaters

Breanna Barbara

Sun, October 29, 2017

8:00 pm

Baby's All Right

Brooklyn, NY

$12

This event is 21 and over

Tess Parks
Tess Parks
“Tess is a true believer in the church of rock’n'roll. She’s got great taste and is really sharp. I got lucky again!“
- Alan McGee

A native of Toronto, Tess Parks moved to London, England at the age of seventeen where she briefly studied photography before dropping out and deciding to focus on music. Tess managed to make an impression on industry legend Alan McGee, founder of Creation Records, albeit the timing of their meeting could hardly have been less ideal; McGee was no longer involved in music and Tess was due to move back to Toronto. After moving back to her hometown in 2012, Tess formed a band on the advice of Alan McGee and less than a year after their meeting, he returned to music with his new label, 359 Music. Tess became one of his first six signings and released her debut record Blood Hot in November 2013 to excellent reviews. One reviewer described her as "Patti Smith on Quaaludes". Others have mentioned her "gauzy psychedelic sound" and "smouldering voice". Alan McGee himself said: "She's only 24 and is already an amazing songwriter... she just doesn't quite know she is yet ... her most beautiful quality is her lack of ego. Tess is an amazing lady". In February 2014, she began recording with Brian Jonestown Massacre frontman Anton Newcombe in Berlin and they completed their new record 'I Declare Nothing' in autumn 2014. The record is due out this summer.
Heaters
Heaters
Less than a year after the release of “Holy Water Pool” – Heaters’ debut, a crushing, revelatory psycho-surf-rock anointment-as-album – there are no apparent signs of distress to the engine that powers this Michigan-made vehicle of sound. To the contrary, Heaters are operating at a higher horsepower than ever before, as evidenced by the 2016 release of “Baptistina.”

“Baptistina” glimmers to a greater degree than anything Heaters have previously unleashed, a full-spectrum sheen that shines across the full panorama of righteous reverb riots. Heaters are in full control of their machine from the opening, looped-lunacy of “Centennial” to the final crash of “Seafoam,” forty-six minutes later – and yet the result of this increase in control can be heard as a willingness to crash their ship completely. But have faith in the pilots – Heaters are living for the next ride.

“Centennial” rides the wave effortlessly, setting the tone for the album in full, hovering in the atmosphere above strutting, Bolan-blasts of riff-rock-lift-off perfection before letting the edges drift and blur, exploring the gravitational pull of less solid ground. Taking the first three songs of “Baptistina” – “Centennial,” “Ara Pacis” and “Orbs” – together is to take the sacrament of a singing, searing psych-rock sinfonia, an expertly-constructed breed of amplified surrealism, framed by the tight corners and unmistakable electric glory of what was once known as rock and roll. It doesn’t matter thatHeaters are not trying to answer the musical question, “What if Grand Funk Railroad got really into Flying Saucer Attack?”; what matters is that the answer is there for the taking.

The album’s centerpiece may very well be “Garden Eater,” a perfectly prepared prescription of the relentless sonic schizophrenia in which Heaters deal so effectively. At nearly eight and a half minutes, it’s about twice as long as anything that appeared on “Holy Water Pool,” giving ample room for the band to spread their sound into broad, bold new dimensions – hypnotic, Hawkwind-hued chanting harmonies, anyone? – without ever detaching from the very root of their sound. It’s perhaps no surprise that the following track, playfully named “Dali,” would be a throbbing reminder of the persistence of memory, given its Silver Apples-esque flavor precedes the perfectly placed flower-power-pop of “Mango.”

The final three tracks of “Baptistina” recall the superb symmetry of the album’s opening trio, an undeniable triptych of pace, power and persona, garage-rock gurus emerging from thin air, spent snares and a dramatic lack of cares. On “Baptistina,” Heaters don’t sound weirder than before – they simply are.

- Ryan Muldoon
Breanna Barbara
Breanna Barbara
Occult Blues.
New album Mirage Dreams out on No Roads Records.
Venue Information:
Baby's All Right
146 Broadway
Brooklyn, NY, 11211
http://babysallright.com/