Twin Peaks

~+ Baby's Presents +~

Twin Peaks

Ron Gallo

Sun, June 11, 2017

Doors: 8:30 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Baby's All Right

Brooklyn, NY

$22.00

Tickets Available at the Door

This event is all ages

Twin Peaks
Twin Peaks
Give Twin Peaks an inch and they'll take a stretch of the road. Having careened across America and beyond, sharing their staggering energy, the band made their third album the best way they know how: by themselves. The same group that produced the scuzzy squalor of their debut 'Sunken' and had legions of fans screaming along to their anthemic sophomore effort, 'Wild Onion,' now swings and serenades with 'Down In Heaven' (out on Grand Jury on May 13, 2016).

Co-produced by the band and longtime collaborator R. Andrew Humphrey, and mixed by new confidant John Agnello (Dinosaur Jr., Kurt Vile, Sonic Youth), the record is by turns raw, polished and wise beyond its years. The diverse new songs beg the listener to sway slowly, bang their head wildly and question what they were doing wasting emotional time on anything less. It is a marked, and some may say mature, development for a band that doesn't know how to play it safe. They aren't here to tell you what youth is like or what being a little older now means, though; they want to join you in a conversation about why we hurt, love and tug at each other.

While Twin Peaks is a bit older, they're not necessarily calmer; their restlessness endures. Born of Chicago's league-leading DIY scene and with several of them remaining friends since elementary school, Cadien Lake James, Clay Frankel, Connor Brodner, Jack Dolan, and most recent addition Colin Croom share an enthusiasm, authenticity and passion their audiences have found contagious. In the three years since dropping out of college to support their debut album 'Sunken,' the band has covered a lot of ground. They've played to ever-increasing crowds, bigger and rowdier each time they come barreling into a city; they were anointed "Best New Band" by NME and countless other blogs, and they have performed for (and partied with) more than hospitable masses at festivals in the states and Europe, including Pitchfork, Lollapalooza, Reading & Leeds, and Roskilde. In between all this action, the group set up camp in the summer of 2015 amidst the solitude of a murky lake in Western Massachusetts, where they could experiment and record on their own terms in the warm living room of a good friend's house.

Recording on reel-to-reel with the band learning studio tricks on the fly, Twin Peaks set out to a make an LP that reflects how far they've come and how much of life is left, trusting themselves to make a record they'd want to hear. James explains, "I've been particularly drawn to records that have a more personal feel, not necessarily lyrically, but in sonic aesthetic, like The Kinks' 'Village Green Society,' Beatles' 'White Album,' and Rolling Stones' 'Beggars Banquet.' We wanted to make a record that employed the restraints of our favorite artists from yesteryear. It was about trying to simplify and hone in on the things that are important to our music and ethos." In considering the development of the band's sound from 'Sunken' to 'Wild Onion' and now to 'Down in Heaven,' Frankel adds, "The bands we admire are the ones who change drastically over the course of their span, like The Velvet Underground, where no two records of theirs sound the same."

Whether sneering or pleading, aggressive or impatient, the thirteen tracks of 'Down In Heaven' are a continuation of the bands path and an eschewing of previous comparisons. It is a record all about feel: heartbreak, forgiveness, anger, jubilation, re-invention, growth. Album opener "Walk To The One You Love," written by James about letting someone close to you go is immediately followed by Frankel's song "Wanted You," with lyrics about not getting the one that you yearn for. With "Stain," perhaps the biggest departure for the band on the record, Frankel says, "I didn't want another love song, so after a while I got what it is, how you suffer for your art but you put up with it because you don't wanna do anything else. It's a song about the love of music." Even though four of the five members contribute lyrics, there are obvious connections both thematically and musically across the record and the band's voice rises unified.

'Down in Heaven' will bring old fans and new Twin Peaks most complex record to date, encompassing elements only teased on their previous efforts. Frankel says, "I don't know yet what kind of band we are, since we keep changing with every year. I guess we are a band unafraid of new influences and changes." Put simply, 'Down In Heaven' makes it increasingly hard to call their sound "classic." It's rock new and old, it's a little bit of country, it's a whole lot of punk attitude, and it's something to get excited about. Twin Peaks is here to stay, and they aren't going to get pinned down.
Ron Gallo
Ron Gallo
When you are at a Ron Gallo show leaning against the bar whining to your roommate about last night you will probably get called out and like it, you might get accidentally whacked by a guitar headstock or your phone punted, you might find yourself succumbing to the internal animalistic feelings you've been suppressing all week and you might even leave a slightly better person. It is a confrontational show with good intention, like a final punch before everything goes to shit. If you say hello afterwards, you might be shocked to be greeted by a genuinely friendly and grateful person that 5 minutes ago looked like a terrifying spastic red-faced maniac.
Formerly the frontman of Philadelphia based rock and roll band, Toy Soldiers, Gallo has gone
through the return of Saturn and the wringer of life over the last couple of years and has come
out the other side a person that dances where the infuriated fighter-of-the-good-fight and the
observational jokester hang out. Like some big-haired spiritual punk raised in the 90s, Gallo is
well-informed of the 20th century roots of American music and obsessed with the NOW in a
time where people are drugged by distraction, bullshit and mediocrity. On Gallo's second solo
record,HEAVY META(out early 2017), he candidly tackles the heavier topics and dark
experiences he lived through during these transformative years.
From his personal ideology on refraining from drug and alcohol use, self-empowerment, domestication, dead love, not knowing someone or yourself, having a stalker, the "struggle" of being an "artist" in 2016, to the disastrous cycle created by terrible parenting, mental illness and post-apocalyptic tales of a world where "all the freaks have gone to bed," this record reflects its subject matter drenched in aggression, fuzz, and walls of Gallo's unconventionally primal approach to the guitar. It is a lyrically driven album laid upon a bed of electricity attempting to wake you up with each listen.
Gallo does not enjoy sitting still so has spent a good portion of the last few years and will spend the foreseeable future on the road backed by Joe Bisirri on bass and Dylan Sevey on drums: Coming to a hole in the wall, night club, backyard, theater, basement, Hardee’s, Sleepy’s Mattress Store, or arena near you. Gallo has appeared at Bonnaroo, SXSW, CMJ, Audiotree, Daytrotter and has received praise from renowned publications such as The FADER, Under the Radar, BrooklynVegan, PASTE among others.
"HEAVY META" will be released at some point in early 2017, but the "RG3 EP" is currently available on American Diamond Recordings, a record label run by Gallo out of his room in the Bordeaux neighborhood of Nashville, TN as of new years day 2016. The mission statement of American Diamond (as well as Gallo himself) is, "ROCK AND ROLL ISN'T DEAD... YOU ARE."
Venue Information:
Baby's All Right
146 Broadway
Brooklyn, NY, 11211
http://babysallright.com/