Brooklyn Is Berning! Night 2 of An Official Bernie 2016 Fundraiser w/ Performances & Appearances by:

Brooklyn Is Berning! Night 2 of An Official Bernie 2016 Fundraiser w/ Performances & Appearances by:

DJ Gang Gang Dance (Liz B and BDG), WET, Cass McCombs & The Chapin Sisters, Dee Dee of Dum Dum Girls, Mas Ysa, Pants Velour, DJ Stretch Armstrong, DJ Moses Archuleta (of Deerhunter), plus special guests & surprises

Wed, January 6, 2016

6:00 pm (event ends at 4:00 am)

Baby's All Right

Brooklyn, NY

$30 - $150

This event is 18 and over

DJ Gang Gang Dance (Liz B and BDG) - (Set time: 11:15 PM)
DJ Gang Gang Dance (Liz B and BDG)
" A freak-out of experimentation." - Q
"Deliriously enjoyable" - Uncut ****
"A bright and endless summer of sound" - The Wire
"Pure exhilaration" - Word
"A masterclass in mind-expanding, boundary-melting art-rock" - The Independent
"One of the most captivating, exciting and original albums of the year" - BBC
"Eye Contact is, in every way, beautifully synthesized" - MOJO ****
"Gang Gang Dance's finest, weirdest, and most uplifting statement yet." - Pitchfork, Best New Music
WET - (Set time: 10:45 PM)
WET
Much has been made of the utopian merging of indie and traditional pop worlds in recent years, but Don't You is an album that takes this fusion to an unprecedented place. This is a benchmark record that delicately sews together the clean songwriting of big-pop, the melodic sensuality of R&B, and the faint twang of country with touches of experimental production and precise instrumentation to create a bold and effortless-feeling new space. Wet, comprised of singer-songwriter Kelly Zutrau, and multi-instrumentalists Joe Valle and Marty Sulkow, make songs that resist easy categorization and invite every listener to bask in its intimate glow. But despite their wide-ranging sensibilities, Wet never compromises its core: sturdy pop songwriting and piercing lyrics.

Written during a period of solitude in a rented house in Western Massachusetts last year, Kelly's deeply personal words on Don't You project both sweetness and brutality, confusion and clarity, rawness and polish, naivete and wisdom: "These days I can't take too much," she sings with an unnerving directness. "Today I scare so easily." Kelly's naked lyrics, along with her intuitive grasp of familiar chords and pure, catchy song structures place her in a diverse lineage of potent American female singer-songwriters. Joe, meanwhile, has emerged as a brilliant producer, delicately fine-tuning each song and creating uncanny grooves. Marty, the true musician of the group, textures the songs with some of the strongest guitar playing in indie-pop today. Together, Joe and Marty work on all aspects of the album's instrumentation; they take Kelly's demos and arrange them to perfection.

The trio met through mutual friends as college students in New York City in 2007. After a few years of informal dabbling, they began officially making music as Wet during the summer of 2012, an especially aimless and emotionally turbulent period. "We were all a little lost and looking for something that felt meaningful, so we focused all of this emotional energy into something productive," Kelly says. After releasing a few songs on SoundCloud - like "Don't Wanna Be Your Girl," a weak-kneed but strong-headed breakup ballad - they quickly began attracting attention, sometimes from unexpected places.

The Fader described Wet as "pure, unhurried… sounds like it was made in the city but good while driving to the country," and social media stars like Kylie Jenner began gushing on Instagram. Former New Yorker music critic Sasha Frere-Jones listed "Don't Wanna Be Your Girl" as his favorite song of 2013, describing it as "completely perfect." Interview magazine wrote: "Electronic music has never been this lonely and beautiful."

The product of many months of seclusion, soul-searching and intense collaboration, Don't You fulfills the promise that Wet's music has made since day one. Old fans will rejoice; new listeners will quickly be pulled into the music's intimate embrac
Cass McCombs & The Chapin Sisters - (Set time: 9:45 PM)
Cass McCombs & The Chapin Sisters
"Big Wheel and Others" is Cass McCombs' seventh-and-a-half album. It comprises twenty-two songs (or, as they are more often and unfortunately known in the After Compact Disc -- hereafter "ACD" era --tracks). But "double album" implies bloat, prog, and concept, so, let's stick with "songs." "Big Wheel and Others" is a bundle, a bindle, a hay bale, and an oil barrel of songs. Some of the genres that are to be found in varying degrees in the songs on this album are: Road songs, rock songs, folk songs, blues songs, country songs, rhythm and blues songs, skronk non-songs, cinema songs, cult songs, poem songs, jams, and ballads -- to use however you wish.

Within his decade-long career, most recently releasing "WIT'S END" and "Humor Risk" in 2011, "Big Wheel and Others" is McCombs' most encompassing work to date, marking a bold new chapter in the myth of this fascinating and singular artist. It's brimming with McCombs' gift for evocative storytelling, discerning introspection, and heartrending melody delivered through a haze of mystery and romance.
Dee Dee of Dum Dum Girls - (Set time: 9:00 PM)
Dee Dee of Dum Dum Girls
End Of Daze had for me signaled exactly that; an end to a part of my life that was confused, difficult, disastrous, and at times, redemptive. It was a marked comment to myself, for future reference, that what will be, will be, and that there is always exciting work to be done ahead. It is never that easy, though, and so was ushered in a new version of confusion, et al.

In the summer of 2012, between tours supporting End Of Daze, I locked out the world and sat down in my apartment to write a new record — clear view of the New York City sky through iron bars like a promise. Like all compulsive minds, I was waiting with bated breath ("and whispering humbleness") to let the muse loose.

I've always lived an introspective life, but it is these rare moments of actively stepping outside my head, to create things tangible to others, that I find truly transcendent. Performing live offers the same rush to me, but it's an even more elusive, haunting ghost. I was reminded of that letter Nick Cave wrote to MTV, in response to being nominated for an award. Apart from his refusal to be competitively evaluated, it was his gentle worship and protection of his own creative process, his crowned Inspiration, which resonated with me. (Do yourself a favor and read it here if you've never: http://www.nick-cave.com/mtv/mtv.shtml.)

I had collected various songs and half-songs over the previous months, vaguely regarding them as future releases, but had the nagging feeling they were to be tossed out on the hunt for the next sound, the next record, which was at that point almost palpable.

And so I spent the next week in a sparkling haze, seven stories closer to Heaven, and when I emerged from the frenzy to go back on tour, indeed ten new songs came with. They were bound together, not just by an overall sonic palette and new guitar pedal, but by time, intention, and fervor.

Do you hear Suede? Siouxie? Cold-wave Patti? Madonna? Cure? Velvet and Paisley Undergrounds? Stone Roses? Cuz I did.

A month later I ran away to Hollywood, and again locked myself up, and two more songs were born from drunken loneliness in room at the Chateau Marmont — points if you can discern which ones.

Still later, in November 2012, I returned to Hollywood to record among the lingering Pet Sounds at East West Studios, in pursuit of a bigger, darker, more urgent sound. Sitting in the room with my favorite team of regulars (Richard Gottehrer and Sune Rose Wagner producing, Alonzo Vargas engineering), it was easy to add some flesh to my song skeletons.

Unfortunately, karma take it or leave it, I had to confront the reality that my voice was destroyed; that the previous year of touring had reduced my once infallible instrument to a pale spectre of its former self. I was broken and when I left California, it was with the heavy burden of an unfinished album. It is a much longer and more boring story, but in short, it was devastating and demanded a severe detour from the future I'd anticipated.

Truly one of those disguised blessings though — the extra time was a gift. What initially felt like a retreat became a reawakening. These songs weren't done at all! And so I worshipped at the tall pile of books I'd bought in Los Angeles, on topics and imagery I'd been consumed by and words that had resonated so deeply with me they felt like artistic collaborators: Rainer Maria Rilke, Anais Nin, Arthur Rimbaud, Paul Verlaine, Charles Baudelaire, Sylvia Plath; the punk poet singers Patti Smith and Lou Reed (who, like many I consider to be my spiritual parents); and finally, an admittedly unhealthy obsession with the Surrealists' manifesto of desire.

Here it was spelled out for me: Desire as muse; Life as experiment; a miracle for every failure and vice-versa. I put pen to paper and I wrote, and then I sang. I sang into my own private microphone, in my tiny bedroom studio, with no one save my make-believe coconspirators to hear me, and no one to weight me with the looming pressure of inability. I was a woman possessed and my possession enabled me.

I write this now, many months later, on the up. I have served the songs and the songs have served me. It is never pretentious to feel and create. So much of my life has been defined, aided, and even saved by music. Here is my best attempt at joining the rock'n'roll ranks, of chasing pop into the dark, and I am as ever, humbled that you listen.
Mas Ysa - (Set time: 8:15 PM)
Mas Ysa
Mas Ysa, the project of nomadic composer Thomas Arsenault, combines love songs, unabashed ecstatic pop, prayer, field recordings and techno into triumphant, danceable, melancholy folk music that pummels the heart rather than dances around it.

Born in Montreal with formative years spent in San Paolo at hard-techno raves, Arsenault's life is one of human and musical experience rather than eye-searing laptop screens. After studying composition at Oberlin Conservatory, where he was part of the Ohio-based Shinkoyo art collective, Arsenault headed west for San Francisco to assist kindred-spirit cult artist Warner Jepson.

Eventually, Arsenault landed on Kent Avenue in Brooklyn, occupying a sprawling loft complex connected to the underground venues 285 Kent and Glasslands. There, he built a studio that yielded records by everyone from Cass McCombs to Laurel Halo, getting out of bed in the dead of night to write songs and record sonic fragments. During the day, Arsenault explored the other side of modern composition by collaborating with Rashaun Mitchell of the storied Merce Cunningham Dance Company.

Born as a live experience in early 2012, Mas Ysa hoists this voracious music history and crashes it head-on with blunt emotional trauma. Early shows vacillated between dancefloor catharsis and inner pain, emphasizing both ritualistic transcendence and the universal bond of folk music.

And with no public songs, marketing, Internet hype or silent brand backing, Mas Ysa was quickly tapped to tour with art-rock icons Deerhunter in between opening big shows for everyone from Purity Ring and Delorean to RZA.

In early 2013, Arsenault made perhaps his most important move in the face of an eviction notice from the City Of New York: He packed-up his gear – including two TR-909s, a homemade analog chaos-weaver and a Kurzweil K2000 borrowed from Oberlin and never returned – and drove north, eventually landing at a house for rent in Woodstock. No stranger to musical mysticism, the secluded compound (with requisite bear encounters) serves as the backdrop for Mas Ysa's initial recordings.

Encompassing bangers, ballads and textured experimental arcs, the debut Mas Ysa EP marks the arrival of a unique cvoice. "Why," a futuristic arms-to-the-sky "Thunder Road," is motorik shock therapy, while "Shame" is a gigantic crescendo of emotional despair and aural exultation. "Mountain Cave" is serene, windy desolation, and the stark forestry of wide-eyed songwriters like Will Oldham is channeled on "Years."

Look for Mas Ysa's debut EP in January 2014 with a full-length to follow via Downtown Records.
Pants Velour - (Set time: 7:30 PM)
Pants Velour
Pants Velour is to New York hip hop as cheese whiz is to Philly Cheesesteaks: undeniably satisfying, but terrible for your cholesterol. There is so much stimulation on stage during a Pants Velour show that if you have a history of epilepsy, you are encouraged to sit behind an iron curtain and listen only. If you are so fortunate to be able to view a Pants Velour performance, you'll fall in love with this unique brand of New York City hip-hop, pop, rock and soul music to form a sound that can only moderately be likened to the Beastie Boys meeting No Doubt in a forbidden, star-crossed, extra marital affair.

The genre-bending music has been described as a "unique brand of hip-hop, R&B and pop" by USA Today, and a combination of "today's pop-soul and yesterday's hip-hop" by the Washington Post. The group's irreverence is second-only to their lyrical cleverness and pop sensible musicality…so...third-only. They are signed to (*oxymoron alert*) independent behemoth, Tommy Boy Entertainment, and have played shows alongside Mobb Deep, Dru Hill, Magic!, and many more.

Pants Velour is lead vocalist Niki Darling, emcee Josh Raff, emcee Eli Northrup, guitarist Sam Coe, keyboardist Jordan Battiste, with bassist Max Calkin, drummer Richard Curtis, and backup vocalist Cenophia Mitchell.
DJ Stretch Armstrong - (Set time: 6:00 PM)
DJ Stretch Armstrong
NYC native Adrian Bartos p/k/a Stretch Armstrong is an internationally recognized DJ with an incomparable career. The 1990s hip-hop legend programmed the "Stretch And Bobbito" radio show, which received high praise from the NY Times and was recognized as "The Best Of All-Time" by the Source Magazine. Stretch produced artist Lil' Kim's first single off of her platinum selling debut album, collaborated with Jay-Z and Eminem, music supervised the film Boiler Room, and made national television appearances on the "Arsenio Hall" and "Conan O'Brien" shows. As a club DJ, the progenitor of "open-format" (incorporating a multitude of musical genres) has spun in 20 countries for clients including Calvin Klein and Red Bull. Currently, Stretch consults brands via his Music Dept platform, and contributes a column on cassette culture to Medium.com's Cuepoint.
DJ Moses Archuleta (of Deerhunter)
DJ Moses Archuleta (of Deerhunter)
From Atlanta, Georgia, the origins of Deerhunter can be traced back to when frontman Bradford Cox first met guitarist Lockett Pundt at high school. Years later Bradford met Moses Archuleta and started jamming together. Other contributors to Deerhunter since its establishment in 2001 include Josh Fauver, Colin Mee and Whitney Petty. The current incarnation consists of Cox, Pundt and Archuleta plus bassist Josh Mckay and guitarist Frankie Broyles.

Deerhunter's first album was a lo-fi experiment not initially intended for the wider world, but appeared in 2005 on a local Atlanta label, Stickfigure. Although officially untitled, it has since become known as Turn It Up, Faggot; a phrase that doesn't actually appear on the sleeve but is an insult that Cox claimed was often thrown at the band during their early gigs. Their next album, Cryptograms (2006), was generally considered to be their real debut and as such things started to get serious for the band. They had moved to fêted Chicago indie, Kranky (Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Low, Stars Of The Lid), and the world outside was starting to pay attention.

Then in mid-2008, Deerhunter and Kranky signed a deal with 4AD, allowing them to finally release music outside the US and the band's next move was to prove epic in more than just musical terms.?? Recorded over the course of a week at the Rare Book Studios in Brooklyn, NY, the Can and Wire-inspired Microcastle (2008) was to propel them to further heights. However, the album leaked four months before release, leading the band back to the studio to record Weird Era Cont., an album in its own right added as a bonus disc to make Microcastle a 25-track colossus. Not content with such prolificacy, the band announced a new five track EP, Rainwater Cassette Exchange, in 2009 and that its release would coincide with the band's extensive European, Japanese and Australian tour in May and June.??

Displaying few signs of slowing down, Halcyon Digest, the band's fourth studio album was released in September 2010. Remaining in their native Georgia to piece together the album, Halcyon Digest took just a few weeks to complete. The recording sessions took place at Chase Park Transduction in Athens with Ben H. Allen helping to co-produce the album, while final track, 'He Would Have Laughed', was recorded separately by Bradford Cox at NOTOWN SOUND in Marietta. To announce the release, the band fully embraced the DIY mindset of their New Wave heroes from the 70's and 80's with a Cox-designed, cut-and-paste Xeroxed flyer. It's with these kind of approaches that Deerhunter continue to widen their sphere of influence and impress with each subsequent release.

After a brief hiatus, during which time Bradford Cox and Lockett Pundt released their own albums as Atlas Sound and Lotus Plaza respectively, a new Deerhunter line-up (with additions of bassist Josh Mckay and guitarist Frankie Broyles) reconvened in January 2013 at Rare Book Studio in Brooklyn, New York. Produced by Nicholas Vernhes and Bradford Cox and recorded in the dead of night, Deerhunter's new longplayer Monomania will be released in May. Monomania finds the group recalling its scrappy punk aesthetic; a perfect nocturnal garage rock album full of the layered and hazy vintage guitar sounds that define them.
Venue Information:
Baby's All Right
146 Broadway
Brooklyn, NY, 11211
http://babysallright.com/